Library & Data

Use our Library & Data section to view and download all of our ChinaFAQs fact sheets, graphics, and links to sources for climate and energy data.

Monday, April 11, 2011 - 09:47

In my testimony today, I will start by discussing both where China is now and its plans for the upcoming five years, and then I will talk about some of the business opportunities this creates for other countries, including the United States, that want to compete in new energy technologies.

Friday, January 14, 2011 - 17:49
Questions Addressed:
  1. What are the U.S. and China doing together to make progress on climate and energy issues?
  2. What are the opportunities and challenges for U.S. – China business cooperation on clean technology and public-private partnerships?
  3. What did the U.S. and China agree to in Cancun?
  4. What important steps is China taking on climate and energy?
  5. What steps can we expect China to take in the coming year?
  6. Are the United States and China’s Cancun commitments sufficient to avert catastrophic climate change?
Wednesday, January 5, 2011 - 17:03

Key Points

  • China is expected to release its second national inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in 2012.
  • In the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, China pledged to start reporting its emissions every two years going forward.
  • Although producing the inventory poses a significant challenge, a recent study concludes that China is developing a reporting system that should make the inventory reliable enough for outsiders to assess whether China is making progress toward meeting its Copenhagen pledge to curb emissions.
  • Both China and the United States have developed special expertise in various aspects of emissions reporting. Collaboration on this issue could bring mutual benefits and help deepen trust between the two nations.
Tuesday, December 7, 2010 - 14:49
Wednesday, December 1, 2010 - 16:02

Key Points

  • At a measuring station near Beijing, US and Chinese scientists are collecting unique measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in air that has passed over one of China’s most industrialized, urbanized regions. This record provides an independent view of China’s efforts to improve energy efficiency.
  • Comparing CO2 levels with carbon monoxide (CO) levels serves as an independent indicator of overall trends in efficiency of fuel combustion in this critical region.
  • The record shows a pattern of improved combustion efficiency from 2005 to 2008, consistent with energy efficiency policies pursued under the 11th Five Year Plan, in particular the goal to reduce energy intensity by 20%.
Monday, November 15, 2010 - 14:50

Key Points

  • Collaboration between the United States and China, the world’s two largest emitters of greenhouse gases, will be key to scaling up the technologies needed to curb climate change and reduce costs.
  • The two nations have collaborated for over 20 years on energy and climate issues, and recently agreed to a new, wide-ranging set of cooperative efforts.
  • Collaboration can deliver tangible benefits to both nations and the world at-large, including new markets for U.S. technologies, better monitoring of China’s emissions, and lower global costs of controlling emissions.
Wednesday, October 20, 2010 - 10:32
Wednesday, October 20, 2010 - 08:18

Key Points

  • “Carbon capture and storage” (CCS) is one widely-discussed approach to curbing global greenhouse gas emissions. The idea is to capture the carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by power, chemical and steel facilities and then store it underground.
  • Both the U.S. and China are interested in CCS because they rely heavily on burning coal to produce electricity. Coal is the source of some 80% of China’s emissions of carbon dioxide.
  • Collaboration between the U.S. and China on CCS could help speed technology development.
  • Cooperation is key to driving down costs for U.S. utilities and taxpayers, and enabling the U.S. to continue to benefit from its vast coal reserves, a source of energy independence and employment.
Thursday, October 14, 2010 - 12:05

Key Points

  • China is investing heavily in building 10,000 miles of high-speed passenger rail over the next decade that will carry trains traveling at up to 217 miles per hour.
  • The system, which will connect most of China’s major cities, could produce significant gains in energy efficiency if travelers shift to the new trains from aircraft and autos.
  • High-speed rail could also help unclog China’s rail freight lines, leading to more energy-efficient cargo transport, according to a recent analysis.
Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 11:06

Download from the link above “Lessons Learned from Guiyang Case”, a presentation by Renmin University’s Wang Ke, Fu Sha and WRI China Country Director Zou Ji from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.