Library & Data

Use our Library & Data section to view and download all of our ChinaFAQs fact sheets, graphics, and links to sources for climate and energy data.

Monday, January 27, 2014 - 18:39

Key Points:

  • China has a long term target to reduce the carbon intensity of the economy by 40-45% from 2005 levels by 2020
  • China also has binding targets to reduce energy intensity by 16% from 2010 levels by 2015 and carbon intensity by 17% from 2010 levels by 2015
  • China has a target to reduce coal consumption as a percentage of primary energy to below 65% by 2017
  • China has ambitious targets for renewable energy in 2015 and 2020
Thursday, December 19, 2013 - 15:00

Key Points:

  • A U.S.-Chinese team led by the Harvard China Project has developed a comprehensive framework for evaluating the economic and environmental costs and benefits of national policies to control air pollution and CO2 emissions in China.
  • Contrary to some perceptions of Chinese inaction on air pollution, China’s SO2 control policy of 2006-2010 may have been one of the most swiftly successful air pollution policies on record judged by key criteria: sulfur emissions fell sharply and prevented as many as 74,000 premature deaths from fine particle (PM2.5) air pollution in 2010 alone, all at little economic cost.
  • Looking to the future, a modest tax on carbon dioxide, starting small and rising to about $6.50 per ton in 2020 (in 2007 dollars), could lead to a 19% reduction in China’s CO2 emissions in 2020 compared to a scenario with no tax, with little effect on GDP growth and consumption over the long run.
  • Such a carbon tax would also deliver powerful ancillary benefits: reduced concentrations of an array of domestic air pollutants and prevention of as many as 89,000 premature deaths a year by 2020.
Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 11:51

Key Points

  • Currently, China gets about 8% of its total primary energy from non-fossil sources. Official targets aim to increase that share to at least 11.4 % in 2015 and 15% in 2020.
  • Solar Power: China is the world’s largest producer and exporter of solar cells (PVs). In 2012, China manufactured 30% of all PV cells in the world.
Wednesday, July 10, 2013 - 09:26

Summary:
CAIT is WRI’s Climate Analysis Indicators Tool – an information and analysis tool on global climate change. It provides a comprehensive and comparable database of greenhouse gas emissions data (including all major sources and sinks) and other relevant indicators. CAIT can be used to analyze data questions and to support policy decisions made under the UNFCCC and other fora.

Data Source
Wednesday, July 3, 2013 - 11:08
“Large scale cooperative action – is more critical than ever. Such action is crucial both to contain climate change and to set the kind of powerful example that can inspire the world.”
-Joint U.S.-China Statement on Climate Change, April 13, 20131


Friday, June 21, 2013 - 11:12

Key Points:

  • Currently, China gets about 8% of its total primary energy from renewable sources. Official targets aim to increase the share of primary energy from non-fossil sources to at least 11.4% in 2015 and 15% in 2020.1
  • Hydropower: China currently has the largest hydropower capacity in the world, with about 229 gigawatts (GW) currently, and a target of 290 GW for 2015.
  • Wind Power: China ranks 1st in the world in installed wind power capacity, with about 75 GW. China is also the world’s fastest-growing installer of wind, and it aims to have 100 GW of wind installed by 2015.2
  • Solar: China is also attempting to dramatically scale up solar power, planning to have at least 35 GW of installed solar by 2015, and currently has around 7.5 GW installed.
  • Investment: China was the number one invester in renewable energy in 2012, accounting for nearly a quarter of global investment
Wednesday, May 29, 2013 - 13:33

This issue brief explains the reasons why China is taking action on clean energy and climate change and the benefits it seeks. The brief shows how other countries, including the U.S., can benefit from taking action. The brief demonstrates that both the U.S. and China have strong reasons for engaging and working together to confront climate change.

Saturday, December 8, 2012 - 15:38

China submitted its “Second National Communication on Climate Change of the People’s Republic of China” to the UNFCCC in November 2012. The Communication contains a national greenhouse gas inventory of China’s emissions in 2005, and descriptions of the impacts of climate change in China and China’s policies and actions on climate change mitigation.

Friday, October 12, 2012 - 12:11

Presentation by Stephen Munro, Policy and International Analyst, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, given at a Congressional briefing “Why China Is Acting on Clean Energy: Successes, Challenges, and Implications for U.S. Policies”, Washington, D.C., October 12, 2012.