Latest from ChinaFAQs

Lord Nicholas Stern and WRI China Country Director Zou Ji Host Joint Seminar on Climate Change in Beijing

WRI and Renmin University hosted a joint seminar with Lord Nicholas Stern and his colleagues from the London School of Economics’ Grantham Research Institute, on Thursday, March 25, in Beijing, during which Lord Stern and some of Beijing’s leading climate change scholars discussed current efforts to mitigate climate change and the challenge of maintaining global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees centigrade.

ChinaFAQs Experts Testify on China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, April 8, 2010

ChinaFAQs Experts Rob Bradley, Jennifer Turner, Stephen Hammer, and Angel Hsu testified before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission on April 8 to lend insight into both China’s domestic and international Green Energy and Environmental Policies.

See the Library & Data section for the complete testimonies of all four experts, or follow the links below:

Testimony by Rob Bradley on China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, April 8, 2010

Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the deliberations of this Commission.

My name is Rob Bradley, and I am Director of the International Climate Policy Initiative at the World Resources Institute. The World Resources Institute is a non-profit, non-partisan environmental think tank that goes beyond research to provide practical solutions to the world’s most urgent environment and development challenges.

Testimony by Jennifer Turner on China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, April 8, 2010

Since 1999 I have directed the China Environment Forum (CEF) at the Woodrow Wilson Center, where we convene meetings, organize exchanges, and create publications that promote dialogue predominantly among U.S. and Chinese policymaker, business, NGO, and research communities on environmental and energy challenges in China. In our current project “Cooperative Competitors: Building New U.S.-China Energy and Climate Networks” we are tapping into CEF’s extensive network of energy experts to explore practical and mutually beneficial avenues for U.S.-China clean energy cooperation. We are also involved in a three-year USAID-supported project focused on environmental governance in China and another project in which we are convening water experts to examine water pollution challenges in Chinese lakes.

Testimony by Angel Hsu on China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, April 8, 2010

Chairmen Shea and Reinsch and Members of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, good morning and thank you for this opportunity to participate in today’s discussion regarding China’s green energy and environmental policies. My name is Angel Hsu, and I am a doctoral candidate researching Chinese environmental performance measurement, policy, and governance at Yale University. After having the opportunity to attend the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen this past December, I have been specifically asked to address China’s role in the Copenhagen climate negotiations and the implications of this experience for China’s partnerships with the United States and developing nations.

Testimony by Stephen Hammer on China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, April 8, 2010

Mr. Reinsch, Mr. Shea, and other distinguished members of the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission. Thank you very much for the invitation to join you this morning. It is an honor to be here.

My name is Stephen Hammer, and I am the Executive Director of the Energy Smart Cities Initiative, a project of the Shanghai, Beijing and Washington DC-based NGO known as JUCCCE – the Joint US-China Collaboration on Clean Energy. For the past three years, JUCCCE has been working to change the way China uses and supplies its energy.

Testimony by Deborah Seligsohn to the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, April 1, 2010

Thank you for the opportunity to contribute to the deliberations of this Commission. My name is Deborah Seligsohn, and I am Senior Advisor to the China Climate and Energy Program at the World Resources Institute. The World Resources Institute is a non-profit, non-partisan environmental think tank that goes beyond research to provide practical solutions to the world’s most urgent environment and development challenges. We work in partnership with scientists, businesses, governments, and non-governmental organizations in more than seventy countries to provide information, tools and analysis to address problems like climate change, the degradation of ecosystems and their capacity to provide for human well-being.