Latest from ChinaFAQs

China Looks to Bus Rapid Transit Systems to Cope with Rapid Urbanization

Faced with a rapidly urbanizing population, China’s central government has set out to boost mass transit use in its largest cities to 60% from the current 35%. Yet with forecasts of up to 250 million cars on its roadways by 2025, China must seek innovative ways to tackle that goal. The recent success of the southern city of Guangzhou’s bus rapid transit system may provide part of the answer.

Senate Energy Committee Questions Department of Energy Secretary Chu on U.S. Energy Spending and Clean Energy Competitiveness With China

The U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources held a hearing on Wednesday, February 16th, to receive testimony from Energy Secretary Dr. Steven Chu on the Department of Energy’s Fiscal Year 2012 Budget Request. In the Chairman’s opening statement, Senator Bingaman (D-NM) said: “…we actually spend less than China on energy R&D per unit of GDP. China is investing heavily in manufacturing and deploying wind, solar, and nuclear power plants. These investments are already translating into global sales and domestic Chinese jobs in an area where the United States once led the world.”

China Institutes New Car Policies, But Are They Enough?

One present Santa may have brought a lot of Chinese families this year: a small car. On [December 28th], the Chinese government announced a 10 percent sales tax on small cars effective January 1, sending many who had planned to purchase private vehicles in a dash to meet the year-end deadline.

China's Industrial Energy Audits: New Study From Lawrence Berkeley

A team of researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s China Energy Group recently released an in-depth study on China’s industrial energy auditing practices. Because China’s industrial sector accounts for roughly two thirds of China’s total energy consumption, industrial energy audits play a critical role in assessing the efficacy of China’s policies and progress in improving energy efficiency.

Brighter Outlook Ahead?: Q&A with Mark Levine

This interview originally appeared on the China Dialogue and is reposted with permission.

New data from an American research group suggests China’s energy demand will peak by 2030. Linden Ellis asked Mark Levine, the man behind the numbers, about their implications.

Q&A: Energy, Water, and China's Economy

This interview originally appeared on the Asia Water Project: China website and is reposted with permission.

Energy and water constraints have emerged as critical sustainability issues for China’s economy – particularly if the country is to continue to see significant GDP growth and provide the estimated 10 million jobs needed annually. Asia Water Project recently posed questions about the water-energy nexus to Professor Zou Ji, WRI’s China Country Director, and Lijin Zhong and Hua Wen of WRI’s China Water Team. Their responses are below:

President Hu and President Obama in Washington: Advancing the clean energy partnership between the United States and China

President Hu Jintao concluded his visit to the United States Friday, after meeting with President Obama and other top government and business leaders in Washington, D.C., and Chicago. Among the many issues on the agenda for these two leaders, strengthening cooperation on climate change and clean energy is an area where real progress is being made.