Fact Sheets

ChinaFAQs — Short Take

Library File: 

Summary of key information on China’s actions on climate and clean energy and the implications for the United States.

ChinaFAQs: Renewable Energy In China - An Overview

Key Points

  • Currently, China gets about 9% of its total primary energy from non-fossil sources. Official targets aim to increase that share to at least 11.4 % in 2015 and 15% in 2020.
  • Solar Power: China is the world’s largest producer and exporter of solar cells (PVs).

ChinaFAQs: U.S.-China Collaboration: Can They "Inspire the World"?

“Large scale cooperative action – is more critical than ever. Such action is crucial both to contain climate change and to set the kind of powerful example that can inspire the world.”
-Joint U.S.-China Statement on Climate Change, April 13, 20131


ChinaFAQs: Renewable Energy In China: A Graphical Overview of 2012

Key Points:

  • Currently, China gets about 8% of its total primary energy from renewable sources. Official targets aim to increase the share of primary energy from non-fossil sources to at least 11.4% in 2015 and 15% in 2020.1
  • Hydropower: China currently has the largest hydropower capacity in the world, with about 229 gigawatts (GW) currently, and a target of 290 GW for 2015.
  • Wind Power: China ranks 1st in the world in installed wind power capacity, with about 75 GW. China is also the world’s fastest-growing installer of wind, and it aims to have 100 GW of wind installed by 2015.2
  • Solar: China is also attempting to dramatically scale up solar power, planning to have at least 35 GW of installed solar by 2015, and currently has around 7.5 GW installed.
  • Investment: China was the number one investor in renewable energy in 2012, accounting for nearly a quarter of global investment

Issue Brief: Why is China Taking Action on Clean Energy and Climate Change?

This issue brief explains the reasons why China is taking action on clean energy and climate change and the benefits it seeks. The brief shows how other countries, including the U.S., can benefit from taking action. The brief demonstrates that both the U.S. and China have strong reasons for engaging and working together to confront climate change.

ChinaFAQs: Road Testing American Carbon-Saving Technology in China

Key Points

  • U.S. environmental engineering company LP Amina developed a new technology that improves efficiency and reduces pollution at coal-fired power plants, and is collaborating with Chinese utilities to demonstrate it.
  • LP Amina leveraged its participation in U.S.-China public-private partnerships to find partners for demonstrating the technology and potential buyers.
  • The component is being manufactured in Michigan, Ohio, and West Virginia for buyers in the U.S., China and around the globe.
  • The new design saves coal and cuts emissions of CO2 and other pollutants from power plants– promising significant environmental benefits.

ChinaFAQs: China Adopts World-Class Pollutant Emissions Standards for Coal Power Plants

Key Points

  • China’s new emissions standards for power plants are comparable to standards in the developed world in important respects.
  • These standards are being phased in quickly. They apply to new plants starting Jan. 1, 2012, and existing plants have just 2½ years to meet the standards.
  • The standards include provisions for even greater stringency in highly polluted areas.
  • China has raised electricity rates to fund the $41 billion investment in new pollution abatement equipment as well as the operating costs needed to comply with the standards.
  • These measures also encourage greater energy efficiency and the use of renewables, as they raise the cost of coal-fired power.

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part I: Will the U.S. and China Reap the Mutual Benefits?

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief highlights opportunities in the global clean energy revolution, discusses the comparative strengths of each nation, and provides examples of proposals and policies that the U.S. can employ to seize these opportunities by encouraging clean energy development. The brief stresses that the U.S. should capitalize on its strengths and take a strategic approach to innovation and commercialization. (Click to download)

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part II: U.S.-China Collaboration in Public-Private Partnerships

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief profiles a selection of recent U.S.-China cooperative projects in clean energy, offering a flavor of the breadth and depth of Sino-American cooperation, as well as potential benefits and challenges.

ChinaFAQs: China’s Energy Conservation Accomplishments of the 11th Five Year Plan

Key Points

  • China’s mounting energy demand spurred by rapid economic growth prompted important energy-saving measures in its 11th Five Year Plan.
  • Researchers found that many projects conceived to improve energy intensity were on track to meet or surpass their goals, while others have lagged.
  • The study offers recommendations for strengthening future efforts.