United States-China Cooperation

ChinaFAQs Experts to Testify Before Congressional-Executive Commission on China

Senator Byron Dorgan, Chairman and Representative Sander Levin, Cochairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China invite you to a roundtable discussion on

“Transparency in Environmental Protection and Climate Change in China”

Thursday, April 1, 2010
2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dirksen Senate Office Building, Room 628

David Pumphrey

David Pumphrey is a senior fellow and co-director of the CSIS Energy and National Security Program. He has extensive public-sector experience in international energy security issues. He was most recently deputy assistant secretary for international energy cooperation at the Department of Energy.

During his career with the US Federal Government, he worked on a wide range of energy policy issues. Mr. Pumphrey led the development and implementation of policy initiatives with individual countries and multilateral energy organizations.

Contact Info: 

Center for Strategic and International Studies
dpumphrey@csis.org
(202) 457-8773

Foreign Wind Companies Create Good U.S. Jobs

There has been a lot of concern in the media (see Green Inc. and Washington Post articles) and in the U.S. Senate recently about stimulus grants for wind energy projects going to China and other foreign countries. On March 3rd, a group of Senators called for the suspension of the renewables grant program until rules had been passed that made sure projects used American components and labor. But there is more to that story than meets the eye.

Empirical evidence demonstrates that predictable support for wind power improves local manufacturing capacity and creates local jobs. Consistent support in the form of the stimulus and long term programs such as a Renewable Energy Standard will give investors the certainty they need to plan and create jobs in the United States.

Solar Hops: US-China Cooperation; Provinces Get Going; Suntech Shining Strong

Its been a while since we've had an extensive discussion of China's solar market. Here, we catch up with some of the major the developments in this space over the past half year or so -- A new US-China dynamic highlighted by two-large scale projects, policy action by provincial-level governments, and lots of activity by Chinese solar poster child Suntech, and more!

Key Opportunities for U.S.-China Cooperation on Coal and CCS

A December 2009 report on Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) and Coal in the United States and China, published by the Brookings Institution’s John L. Thorton China Center, authored by ChinaFAQs expert Kelly Sims Gallagher, Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Policy at The Fletcher School, Tufts University.

Overview:
One of the most striking commonalities between China and the United States is that both countries are blessed with large coal reserves,and naturally, both rely heavily on coal for their primary energy supply. U.S. coal reserves are estimated at 243 billion tons (29% of world total), and Chinese at 115 billion tons (14% of world total). China’s reserves-to-production ratio, however,is much shorter than that of the United States with only 41 years of currently-estimated economically recoverable coal compared with 224 years in the United States at current production rates (BP Statistical Review 2009). As the most abundant fossil energy resource in both countries, it is virtually certain that both will continue to rely heavily on coal due to its relatively low cost and the energy security benefits related to not having to import substantial foreign supplies of primary energy. The utilization of coal will be increasingly limited by the climate change problem, however, unless advanced coal and carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies can be developed, demonstrated, and rendered cost-effective within the next 5-15 years.

Big New Deals in China for U.S. Renewable Energy Companies

Investing Big in Concentrating Solar

If you’d asked us a few weeks ago, we might have said that China was charging ahead in wind and in solar photovoltaics, but was not a big player in the emerging technology of concentrating solar power. That has now changed dramatically. Last week U.S. company eSolar announced a $5 billion, 2 GW deal with Chinese company China Shandong Penglai Electric Power Equipment Manufacturing Co. If eSolar and partners succeed this will be the largest set of concentrating solar plants anywhere in the world.

E&E News: COPENHAGEN: U.S., China may be near 'transparency' compromise

COPENHAGEN – There’s talk here today of a possible U.S.-China compromise over the transparency of developing countries’ emissions data.

Chinese and U.S. officials this afternoon homed in on what many are calling an obvious solution to a tortured problem: developing new guidelines through the reports that China and other countries already submit to the U.N. climate regime.

“I think the issue now is to work out the exact language,” said Ailun Yang, climate director for Greenpeace China. “I’m very confident that this can be resolved.”

The possible solution comes just hours after Sen.

Bridge Over Troubled Waters

Your ChinaFAQs team has been in the swirling currents of the Copenhagen climate change negotiations for over a week, attending press conferences and listening in the corridors, but now the negotiators are running out of time. Before dawn today, the BBC World News led with the story that the sticking point in the negotiations is whether China will allow intrusive review of its progress on slowing the growth of greenhouse gas emissions. Of course, the media can’t resist a food fight, and all week the press has been filled with reports of verbal missiles supposedly being hurled by American and Chinese negotiators. We’ve also seen exaggerated portrayals of the supposedly-huge chasm separating the U.S. and China on questions like whether the U.S. will provide funds to China for clean technology and the extent of monitoring and review of China’s action.

WRI: Comparison of Chinese and U.S. Energy Statistics

Today, each Chinese citizen produces only one fifth the GHG emissions of an average American consumer, and China still has many unmet energy needs. Most Chinese have a much lower standard of living than the average American. Half the Chinese population has no access to winter heating, and most have limited access to motorized transportation. Therefore, the challenge for China in the short term is to reduce the rate of growth of its GHG emissions as it strives to meet the growing energy demands of its people.

"Breaking the Climate Impasse with China", a New Publication by ChinaFAQs Expert Kelly Sims Gallagher

ChinaFAQs Expert Kelly Sims Gallagher has just published a new discussion paper entitled “Breaking the Climate Impasse with China: A Global Solution” in the Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements Discussion Paper Series.

Overview:
International climate negotiations are at an impasse because the world’s two largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitters, the United States and China, are unwilling to accept binding emission-reduction commitments. At the same time, each blames the other for its inaction. This paper proposes a global “deal” for breaking the deadlock in a way that reconciles both countries’ economic concerns with the imperative of reducing emissions. The deal has two core elements: (1) All major emitting countries agree to reduce GHG emissions by implementing significant, mutually agreeable, domestic policies and (2) The largest industrialized-country emitters agree to establish a global Carbon Mitigation Fund that would finance the incremental cost of adopting low-carbon technologies in developing countries.

Download the full paper at: http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/19698/breaking_the_climate_impasse_with_china.html.