United States-China Cooperation

Top US-China Experts Discuss Tianjin and US-China Climate and Energy Issues

The international climate meetings in Tianjin on October 4-9 will be a key moment for US-China relations on climate and energy. Today ChinaFAQs experts held a press call to discuss how the countries are cooperating on climate and energy issues, and the challenges and benefits involved.

Climate Change Messengers in China: Al Gore Brings His Lecture to Beijing

Former Vice President Al Gore launched his Climate Project’s lecture program in Beijing June 10, personally devoting an entire day to training 300 Chinese in how to give his famous lecture. The event was striking for the diversity and the quality of the participants. His partners in China’s Ministry of Science and Technology and the China Agenda 21 Sustainable Development Office invited participants from all over China, including scholars, government officials, corporate middle managers, independent entrepreneurs, NGO staff and students.

ChinaFAQs: Industrial Energy Efficiency Cooperation

Why is Industrial Energy So Important in China?

China’s energy use more than quadrupled from 1980 to 2007 (see Fig. 1), and continues to grow, due in part to the demands of urbanization (i.e. construction of new buildings and infrastructure), and in part to rising production of manufactured goods.i Although China has not yet reached the energy consumption level of the U.S, China nonetheless – due to a more polluting fuel mix – recently surpassed the U.S. in energy-related CO2 emissions.ii

Energy Consumption by Major End-Use Sector in China (1980-2007) and the U.S. (2007)

China’s energy use more than quadrupled from 1980 to 2007 (see Fig. 1), and continues to grow, due in part to the demands of urbanization (i.e. construction of new buildings and infrastructure), and in part to rising production of manufactured goods.i Although China has not yet reached the energy consumption level of the U.S, China nonetheless – due to a more polluting fuel mix – recently surpassed the U.S. in energy-related CO2 emissions.ii

US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue: Pledges of Greater Energy Market Transparency and Energy Supply Diversification

Climate change was not the big news it was a year ago at the US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED). This is not surprising given that China made its major commitment on emissions reductions – its 40-45% carbon intensity target by 2020 – last year and US climate legislation is pending in the Senate. But many of the key players on climate change, including Secretary of State Clinton, her Climate Negotiator Todd Stern, and Department of Energy Assistant Secretary David Sandalow, were at the meeting. Energy Secretary Steven Chu stayed in the US to address the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, but his Department co-hosted three major bilateral seminars on energy efficiency, renewable energy and biofuels after the S&ED.

Stephanie Ohshita

Stephanie Ohshita works on energy-based strategies for multiple environmental problems—from local air pollution to global climate change—combining engineering with tools from political economy and organizational analysis. Her research examines: policy design and implementation; energy efficiency (industrial, city-wide); international cooperation mechanisms; city-level climate action; diffusion of clean and efficient technology; emissions inventories; and risk management.

Contact Info: 

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory SBOhshita@lbl.gov (510) 486-5062

ChinaFAQs Experts Testify on China’s Green Energy and Environmental Policies before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission, April 8, 2010

ChinaFAQs Experts Rob Bradley, Jennifer Turner, Stephen Hammer, and Angel Hsu testified before the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission on April 8 to lend insight into both China’s domestic and international Green Energy and Environmental Policies.

See the Library & Data section for the complete testimonies of all four experts, or follow the links below:

ChinaFAQs Experts to Testify Before Congressional-Executive Commission on China

Senator Byron Dorgan, Chairman and Representative Sander Levin, Cochairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China invite you to a roundtable discussion on

“Transparency in Environmental Protection and Climate Change in China”

Thursday, April 1, 2010
2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Dirksen Senate Office Building, Room 628

David Pumphrey

David Pumphrey is a senior fellow and co-director of the CSIS Energy and National Security Program. He has extensive public-sector experience in international energy security issues. He was most recently deputy assistant secretary for international energy cooperation at the Department of Energy.

During his career with the US Federal Government, he worked on a wide range of energy policy issues. Mr. Pumphrey led the development and implementation of policy initiatives with individual countries and multilateral energy organizations.

Contact Info: 

Center for Strategic and International Studies
dpumphrey@csis.org
(202) 457-8773

Foreign Wind Companies Create Good U.S. Jobs

There has been a lot of concern in the media (see Green Inc. and Washington Post articles) and in the U.S. Senate recently about stimulus grants for wind energy projects going to China and other foreign countries. On March 3rd, a group of Senators called for the suspension of the renewables grant program until rules had been passed that made sure projects used American components and labor. But there is more to that story than meets the eye.

Empirical evidence demonstrates that predictable support for wind power improves local manufacturing capacity and creates local jobs. Consistent support in the form of the stimulus and long term programs such as a Renewable Energy Standard will give investors the certainty they need to plan and create jobs in the United States.