United States-China Cooperation

Haibing Ma

Haibing Ma is Manager of the Worldwatch Institute’s China Program. A native Chinese, Ma’s primary focus is on China-related topics. His priority research and management areas at Worldwatch are clean energy and climate change, including an initiative to explore green economy potentials and impacts in China. Ma is also working closely with Worldwatch’s partners in China to explore the role of unconventional gas and to initiate renewable energy mapping programs at the provincial and local levels.

Contact Info: 

Worldwatch Institute
hma@worldwatch.org
(202) 452-1992 extension 517

5 Myths and Realities About U.S.-China Solar Trade Competition

“The specifics of this case speak most directly to the U.S. solar industry, of course, but also to trade enforcement in general and the U.S. economy more broadly. In this column we will examine the five most common arguments we’ve heard from the antitariff contingent in the U.S. solar industry, and why we think these arguments don’t hold water—drawing larger lessons about the key role of trade enforcement to the health of U.S. companies and our economy.”

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress…

CEF Event: Cooperation or Conflict? Contradictions in U.S.-China Clean Energy Relations

ChinaFAQs expert Joanna Lewis, professor at Georgetown University, joined Craig Allen, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia at the Department of Commerce, and Jigar Shah, President of the Coalition for Affordable Energy, for a discussion of U.S.-China clean energy relations at the Woodrow Wilson Center in May as part of the China Environment Forum (CEF).

The Strategic and Economic Dialogue and Energy and Climate

The State of Play of Chinese Policy and Bilateral Issues

The Obama administration’s fourth major meeting with China, involving multiple Cabinet Secretaries and Chinese Ministers, the Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED), will be held May 3 and 4 in Beijing. As usual, the U.S. delegation will be lead by Secretaries Clinton and Geithner, and their Chinese hosts will be Vice Premier Wang Qishan (who focuses on economic policy) and State Councilor Dai Bingguo (responsible for foreign policy).

Clean Tech’s Rise- Two New Issue Briefs from ChinaFAQs

As leaders prepare to meet for the fourth annual U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) in Beijing this week, ChinaFAQs just released two new issue briefs that explore areas of collaboration between the two nations.

The papers highlight that both the prospect of a $2.2 trillion global market in clean energy by 2020 and expected Chinese investment of $300 billion over the next five years, to meet its ramped-up renewable energy targets in its 12th Five-Year Plan, present a huge opportunity for the U.S. Reaping these benefits will be challenging, but can be fostered by supportive U.S. policies, coupled with collaboration from private industry.

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part I: Will the U.S. and China Reap the Mutual Benefits?

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief highlights opportunities in the global clean energy revolution, discusses the comparative strengths of each nation, and provides examples of proposals and policies that the U.S. can employ to seize these opportunities by encouraging clean energy development. The brief stresses that the U.S. should capitalize on its strengths and take a strategic approach to innovation and commercialization. (Click to download)

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part II: U.S.-China Collaboration in Public-Private Partnerships

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief profiles a selection of recent U.S.-China cooperative projects in clean energy, offering a flavor of the breadth and depth of Sino-American cooperation, as well as potential benefits and challenges.

Getting Our Act Together On Solar – Elements of a Winning Strategy

The watchword in today’s global energy markets is change. This change in part includes the advance of solar and other renewable energy technologies – advances that can boost economic growth, improve energy security, and help address global warming. However, reaping these benefits, and particularly the jobs that go with these global industries, requires a strategic approach to clean technology innovation. This blog discusses how the United States might use an innovation-centered strategy to compete in the increasingly tough global solar power industry.

Ask the ChinaFAQs Experts: “With New Chinese Leadership, What Are the Prospects on Climate & Energy Policy?"

Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, expected to become president next year, is visiting Washington the week of February 13th. This has drawn attention to the future of the U.S.-China relationship. The visit presents an attractive platform to discuss climate and energy issues, which have often represented areas of cooperation between the two countries. We asked our panel of ChinaFAQs experts to provide their insights on top issues for new leadership to address on climate and energy, as well as prospects for the U.S.-China relationship on climate and energy under a Xi presidency.

Testimony by Mikkal Herberg Before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, January 26, 2012

I first would like to thank the members of the Commission for the opportunity to testify to this important group. It is an honor and a privilege.

I have been asked to speak about China’s approach to securing its energy supplies and implications for the United States. I will discuss China’s approach, whether it is impacting global energy markets and the competitive prospects of American energy companies, how Beijing’s energy security drive is influencing maritime territorial and sea lane disputes in the seas around Asia, and some suggestions on U.S. policy towards the developments.