United States-China Cooperation

United States and China Agree to Work Together on Phase Down of HFCs

The following is a press release from the White House:

Today, President Obama and President Xi agreed on an important new step to confront global climate change. For the first time, the United States and China will work together and with other countries to use the expertise and institutions of the Montreal Protocol to phase down the consumption and production of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), among other forms of multilateral cooperation.

4 Topics On Clean Energy And Climate Change Obama And Xi Should Consider

This post originally appeared on Forbes.com.

When President Obama and China’s President Xi Jinping meet in California this week, they will be seeking to build trust and chart a course for improved relations. While tensions abound over various issues, clean energy and climate is one area where cooperation can work.

Exploring Prospects for U.S. Coal Exports to China

The United States and China are the world’s two largest economies. They are also the two largest producers and consumers of coal and the largest emitters of carbon dioxide. In recent years, however, their paths on coal have started to diverge.

Over the last few years, coal consumption has dropped dramatically in the United States, mainly due to low natural gas prices. In response to weak domestic demand, the U.S. coal industry has been rushing to find its way out to the international market. Last year, U.S.

U.S. and China Announce Joint Climate Change Working Group for Strategic and Economic Dialogue

The U.S. and China pledged to boost cooperation on climate change in a Joint U.S.-China Declaration on Climate Change signed by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi on Saturday April 13 in Beijing.

China’s New Leadership: Confronting Energy, Climate, and Environmental Challenges

Leading China experts and top media representatives participated in a ChinaFAQs press call today on how the country will address pressing environmental, climate and energy challenges at home and globally in the coming years. At the National People’s Congress beginning March 5, Xi Jinping and Li Keqiang are expected to formally become China’s president and premier, respectively. Other top spots in China’s ministries will also be assigned, with implications for China’s future of low-carbon development and for the U.S. The briefing was one of ChinaFAQs’ events highlighting the reasons for China’s action on low-carbon energy, including: energy security, economic competitiveness through technological innovation, and climate and environmental impacts.

ADVISORY: Press Call on China’s New Leadership: Confronting Energy and Environmental Challenges

As China continues its leadership transition next week at the National People’s Congress, many are wondering how the country will confront its pressing environmental, climate, and energy challenges. On Friday, March 1 at 9 a.m. EST, WRI’s ChinaFAQs network will bring together leading experts for a press teleconference to discuss these issues.

Huei Peng

Dr. Huei Peng is a Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan and Director of the US Clean Vehicle Consortium of the US-China Clean Energy Research Center. His research interests include adaptive control and optimal control, with emphasis on their applications to vehicular and transportation systems. His current research focuses include design and control of hybrid electric vehicles and vehicle active safety systems.

Contact Info: 

Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Michigan
G036 Lay Automotive Laboratory
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2133 USA
(734) 936-0352
E-mail: hpeng@umich.edu

Germany hosts Sustainable Energy High-Level Ministerial Event with China and others at Doha Climate Talks

Although major greenhouse-gas emitting countries were criticized at the latest round of climate negotiations in Doha for failing to show enough ambition, an event held during the second week highlighted leadership from Germany, China, Morocco, and South Africa on clean and renewable energy. Hosted by Peter Altmaier, Federal Environment Minister of Germany, and moderated by the President of the World Resources Institute, Andrew Steer, the panel also included Xie Zhenhua, Vice-Chair of China’s NDRC, Nandi Mayathula Khoza, Minister of Agriculture of South Africa’s Gauteng province, and Fouad Douiri, Morocco’s Energy and Environment Minister.

Trade Cases on Imports of Clean Energy Products from China

The US department of Commerce and the US International Trade Commission have commenced proceedings in trade cases regarding imports of solar cells and other clean energy products from China. The matter is now progressing through the official process for handling such international trade cases. ChinaFAQs has assembled a collection of resources and statements from official sources, media, and concerned groups regarding the cases, and will continue to monitor developments as they unfold.

Haibing Ma

Haibing Ma is Manager of the Worldwatch Institute’s China Program. A native Chinese, Ma’s primary focus is on China-related topics. His priority research and management areas at Worldwatch are clean energy and climate change, including an initiative to explore green economy potentials and impacts in China. Ma is also working closely with Worldwatch’s partners in China to explore the role of unconventional gas and to initiate renewable energy mapping programs at the provincial and local levels.

Contact Info: 

Worldwatch Institute
hma@worldwatch.org
(202) 452-1992 extension 517