Trade and Competitiveness

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part I: Will the U.S. and China Reap the Mutual Benefits?

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief highlights opportunities in the global clean energy revolution, discusses the comparative strengths of each nation, and provides examples of proposals and policies that the U.S. can employ to seize these opportunities by encouraging clean energy development. The brief stresses that the U.S. should capitalize on its strengths and take a strategic approach to innovation and commercialization. (Click to download)

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part II: U.S.-China Collaboration in Public-Private Partnerships

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief profiles a selection of recent U.S.-China cooperative projects in clean energy, offering a flavor of the breadth and depth of Sino-American cooperation, as well as potential benefits and challenges.

Getting Our Act Together On Solar – Elements of a Winning Strategy

The watchword in today’s global energy markets is change. This change in part includes the advance of solar and other renewable energy technologies – advances that can boost economic growth, improve energy security, and help address global warming. However, reaping these benefits, and particularly the jobs that go with these global industries, requires a strategic approach to clean technology innovation. This blog discusses how the United States might use an innovation-centered strategy to compete in the increasingly tough global solar power industry.

The Complexities of the U.S. Decision on Chinese Solar Panel Imports

This week, the U.S. Department of Commerce is expected to issue a preliminary decision on a trade petition filed by SolarWorld Industries America, Inc. SolarWorld alleges that the Chinese have used subsidies to artificially suppress solar panel export prices, and has asked Commerce to levy a duty to eliminate that price discrepancy.

ChinaFAQs expert Melanie Hart and Kate Gordon at the Center for American Progress analyze this trade case and the implications of the decision for the U.S. solar industry and U.S. energy policy in “The Complexities of the U.S. Decision on Chinese Solar Panel Imports.”

What Shale Gas In China Means For The United States

Today I testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission during a hearing on China’s Global Quest for Resources and Implications for the United States. In my testimony, I described the prospects for shale gas in China and its implications for the United States.

Testimony by Mikkal Herberg Before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission, January 26, 2012

I first would like to thank the members of the Commission for the opportunity to testify to this important group. It is an honor and a privilege.

I have been asked to speak about China’s approach to securing its energy supplies and implications for the United States. I will discuss China’s approach, whether it is impacting global energy markets and the competitive prospects of American energy companies, how Beijing’s energy security drive is influencing maritime territorial and sea lane disputes in the seas around Asia, and some suggestions on U.S. policy towards the developments.

Michael Levi

Michael A. Levi is the David M. Rubenstein senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the program on energy security and climate change at the Council on Foreign Relations. He directed CFR’s Independent Task Force on climate change in 2007–2008. His most recent book, The Power Surge, was published in 2013 by Oxford University Press. His previous book, On Nuclear Terrorism, was published by Harvard University Press in 2007. He received his PhD in war studies from the University of London (King’s College) and his MA in physics from Princeton University.

Contact Info: 

Phone: +1.212.434.9495
E-mail: mlevi@cfr.org

China promotes South-South Cooperation in Durban

As part of its green diplomacy strategy and move to promote a positive image in Durban, China for the first time highlighted its own development aid in the context of South-South capacity building and financial assistance with least-developed countries (LDCs) and small-island states (SIDs).

On December 5, Xie Zhenhua, NDRC Vice Minister and head of the Chinese delegation in Durban, announced four major areas of investment through South-South collaboration, including...

ChinaFAQs: U.S.-China Renewable Energy Partnership

Key Points:

  • The US-China Renewable Energy Partnership (USCREP) is matching US cleantech firms with opportunities in Chinese markets.
  • The USCREP undertakes tasks in the key areas of improving wind and solar technologies, integrating renewable power with existing electric power grids, developing international standards and testing protocols for new energy technologies, and collaborating on policies to spur advancement of renewable energy technologies.
  • American companies, such as Boston-based Second Wind, are already benefiting from USCREP-fostered cooperation in terms of potential job creation and expanding exports.

China, US, other APEC Leaders Sign Commitment to Slash Tariffs on Green Goods and Services

At the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Hawaii last week, Chinese President Hu Jintao joined US President Obama and other APEC leaders in signing a pledge to cut tariffs on an undesignated list of environmental goods and services to 5 percent by 2015. APEC members also pledged to eliminate domestic content requirements on goods and services by 2012. Together, the 21 APEC economies account for 60 percent of global trade in environmental goods and services, and the global market for environmental technologies in 2008 represented $782 billion, with nearly $300 billion in the US, according to a US Commerce Department estimate. A spokesman for one organization representing US manufacturers hailed the commitment as a “huge” outcome. Read the full story at Reuters