Trade and Competitiveness

5 ChinaFAQs Experts Testify Before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission

The purpose of this hearing was to examine China’s domestic and international clean energy policies, as well as the state of U.S.-China cooperation on clean energy, in order to provide recommendations to Congress.

The following are short summaries and links to the testimony of the five ChinaFAQs experts:

Jane Nakano

Jane Nakano is a fellow in the Energy and National Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Her research focus includes nuclear energy policy and technology trends globally, energy security issues in Asia, and unconventional energy development in the United States. Prior to joining CSIS in 2010, Nakano was with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and served as the lead staff on U.S. energy engagements with China and Japan. She was responsible for coordinating DOE engagement in the U.S.-China Strategic Economic Dialogue, U.S.-China Energy Policy Dialogue, and U.S.-Japan Energy Dialogue. She also worked on U.S. energy engagement with Indonesia, North Korea, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. From 2001 to 2002, she served at the U.S. embassy in Tokyo as special assistant to the energy attaché. She holds a bachelor’s degree from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service and a master’s degree from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

Contact Info: 

JNakano@csis.org
(202) 775-3210

Carla Freeman

Dr. Carla Freeman is Associate Research Professor of China Studies at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of the Johns Hopkins University and the Director of the SAIS Foreign Policy Institute (FPI). She holds a BA in History from Yale and an MA in China studies and international economics and PhD in international relations from Johns Hopkins SAIS. Before joining the SAIS faculty, she was a political risk consultant covering China, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam, and later worked as a program officer for civil society and community development and sustainability at The Johnson Foundation. Her recent research has examined China’s environmental governance and sustainable development, with her current work focused on the politics of China’s carbon mitigation strategies.

Contact Info: 

cfreeman5@jhu.edu
(202) 663-5890

ChinaFAQs — Short Take

Library File: 

Summary of key information on China’s actions on climate and clean energy and the implications for the United States.

Prologue to the 2013 U.S.-China Strategic & Economic Dialogue – ChinaFAQs Press Call

ChinaFAQs climate and energy experts and top media representatives took part in a ChinaFAQs press call on July 8th to preview the July 10th and 11th U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED), which for the first time will include a designated Climate Change Working Group. ChinaFAQs network experts discussed recent events and potential areas of U.S.-China cooperation, including air pollution, shale gas, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and more. The experts also offered insights into what the S&ED will mean for U.S.

Mixed signals on prospects for settlement of China solar trade cases

Trade negotiations between the European Union and China regarding solar panels have hit a bump in the road, as the European trade commissioner complained about Chinese pressure on individual EU nations that he said was designed to prevent Europe from reaching a consensus.

The Path to Cleaner Air: Can China learn from California?

In a visit to China this week, Jerry Brown, the Governor of California, is putting a special emphasis on the promotion of business deals between China and California as part of the solution to China’s pollution problems.

Building Our Clean Energy Industries: Learning from China’s experience in wind power

As the biggest coal-consuming and coal-producing nation in the world, China is perhaps an unlikely place to find a burgeoning wind power industry. Yet today China is the biggest wind power market in the world and builds almost all its wind turbines at home. China’s wind power capacity has increased over a hundredfold in the past decade (from 344 MW in 2000 to 44,733 MW in 2010) and estimates for 2012 put installed wind capacity at about 80 GW (see Figure 1). Just a decade ago the country had only a handful of wind turbines in operation—all imported from Europe and the United States.

Huei Peng

Dr. Huei Peng is a Professor at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan and Director of the US Clean Vehicle Consortium of the US-China Clean Energy Research Center. His research interests include adaptive control and optimal control, with emphasis on their applications to vehicular and transportation systems. His current research focuses include design and control of hybrid electric vehicles and vehicle active safety systems.

Contact Info: 

Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Michigan
G036 Lay Automotive Laboratory
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2133 USA
(734) 936-0352
E-mail: hpeng@umich.edu

Briefing- Why China Is Acting on Clean Energy: Successes, Challenges, and Implications for U.S. Policies

On October 12, ChinaFAQs and the Environmental and Energy Study Institute (EESI) held a briefing on Capitol Hill about the issues driving China’s renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate policies. While China and the United States differ in important respects, they have some similar challenges and opportunities relating to energy. Both face economic, employment, energy security, and environmental challenges. The United States and China both cooperate and compete with each other on clean energy initiatives and technology.