Renewables and Alternative Energy

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part I: Will the U.S. and China Reap the Mutual Benefits?

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief highlights opportunities in the global clean energy revolution, discusses the comparative strengths of each nation, and provides examples of proposals and policies that the U.S. can employ to seize these opportunities by encouraging clean energy development. The brief stresses that the U.S. should capitalize on its strengths and take a strategic approach to innovation and commercialization. (Click to download)

Issue Brief- Clean Tech's Rise, Part II: U.S.-China Collaboration in Public-Private Partnerships

This ChinaFAQs Issue Brief profiles a selection of recent U.S.-China cooperative projects in clean energy, offering a flavor of the breadth and depth of Sino-American cooperation, as well as potential benefits and challenges.

Getting Our Act Together On Solar – Elements of a Winning Strategy

The watchword in today’s global energy markets is change. This change in part includes the advance of solar and other renewable energy technologies – advances that can boost economic growth, improve energy security, and help address global warming. However, reaping these benefits, and particularly the jobs that go with these global industries, requires a strategic approach to clean technology innovation. This blog discusses how the United States might use an innovation-centered strategy to compete in the increasingly tough global solar power industry.

The Complexities of the U.S. Decision on Chinese Solar Panel Imports

This week, the U.S. Department of Commerce is expected to issue a preliminary decision on a trade petition filed by SolarWorld Industries America, Inc. SolarWorld alleges that the Chinese have used subsidies to artificially suppress solar panel export prices, and has asked Commerce to levy a duty to eliminate that price discrepancy.

ChinaFAQs expert Melanie Hart and Kate Gordon at the Center for American Progress analyze this trade case and the implications of the decision for the U.S. solar industry and U.S. energy policy in “The Complexities of the U.S. Decision on Chinese Solar Panel Imports.”

What Shale Gas In China Means For The United States

Today I testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission during a hearing on China’s Global Quest for Resources and Implications for the United States. In my testimony, I described the prospects for shale gas in China and its implications for the United States.

China At Durban: First Steps Toward a New Climate Agreement

The UN Climate Conference in Durban, South Africa, concluded over the weekend with a consensus to negotiate an agreement that will include all major emitters of warming gases. The conference agreed to a second commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol, extended the work of the group for Long-term Cooperative Action, and most significantly established new negotiations under the Durban Platform. Launching these negotiations was hailed as major progress around the world (Bloomberg, The Statesman, Xinhua). For the first time the world’s three major emitters (by total amount of greenhouse gases emitted), China, the United States and India, have agreed to begin negotiations for an international “protocol, another legal instrument or an agreed outcome with legal force,” indicating that there will be actions and efforts by all countries. (For the implications of this complex legal wording, see my colleague Jake Werksman’s discussion on WRI Insights).

Global Growth – the Story at China Wind Power 2011

China once again hosted its largest wind power expo, China Wind 2011, surpassing last year’s exhibition with the number of companies and the exhibition floor space increasing by 50%. Not surprisingly for an event in Beijing, the China market continued to be a major focus, but this year there was much more sense of a global market with increasing interest in new emerging markets, in particular Latin America.

Bo Kong

Bo Kong is the ConocoPhillips Petroleum Professor of Chinese and Asian Studies and Assistant Professor at the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies.

He is also Senior Fellow of the Foreign Policy Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Senior Associate in the Energy and National Security Program of the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), member of the Advisory Board for the Revenue Watch Institute, member of the International Editorial Board for the Universiti of Kebangsaan Malaysia’ journal—JEBAT: Mal

Contact Info: 

Dept. of International and Area Studies
Cate Center 4
bo.kong@ou.edu
(405) 325-1584

China’s Competitive Advantage in the Solar Industry: How Advantageous is it Really?

In the wake of the Solyndra bankruptcy and amidst reports of an impending trade dispute against China’s solar subsidies, many are asking how US solar manufacturers can possibly compete with Chinese manufacturers. Sure, Chinese solar companies now dominate global solar photovoltaic (PV) markets (see figure below), but that does not mean the US is not still playing an important role in the solar industry. If we just look at how many solar panels are being manufactured here, we miss the more important metric—the total value created by the solar industry in the United States. A significant portion of the revenue from solar projects comes not from manufacturing the panels themselves, but site preparation and system installation, which must be done locally with local jobs.

Worldwatch Report: Green Economy and Green Jobs in China

Aurthors Dr. Jihua Pan, Haibing Ma, and Dr. Ying Zhang discuss the potential for China’s green development strategy to generate jobs in energy, transportation, and forestry in a report published by the Worldwatch Institute.

“Over the past decade, and especially during the 11th Five-Year period of 2006–10, China has prioritized green development in almost all of its leading economic sectors.