Renewables and Alternative Energy

David Kline

David Kline is the Manager of the Market and Policy Impact Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). He also manages NREL’s work in support of the U.S.-China Renewable Energy Partnership, one of the cooperative programs that grew out of visits to China by President Obama in 2009. Before coming to NREL in 1991, he led the natural gas planning and forecasting group at the California Energy Commission and worked in the corporate planning office of the Natomas Company.

His research is focused on international energy policy, with an emphasis on China, Ghana, Egypt, Morocco, and South Africa; China’s Village Electrification Program; Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention; and Greenhouse gas mitigation.

He holds a B.S. in mathematics from Stanford University and a M.S. and Ph.D. in management science and engineering from Stanford University.

Contact Info: 

National Renewable Energy Laboratory
david.kline@nrel.gov
(303) 384-7435

Q&A: Energy, Water, and China's Economy

This interview originally appeared on the Asia Water Project: China website and is reposted with permission.

Energy and water constraints have emerged as critical sustainability issues for China’s economy – particularly if the country is to continue to see significant GDP growth and provide the estimated 10 million jobs needed annually. Asia Water Project recently posed questions about the water-energy nexus to Professor Zou Ji, WRI’s China Country Director, and Lijin Zhong and Hua Wen of WRI’s China Water Team. Their responses are below:

Official Statements on the Hu-Obama Summit

China and the U.S. issued a joint statement Wednesday, January 19, covering the range of issues discussed during President Hu Jintao’s state visit to Washington this week. The White House also posted a fact sheet summarizing Hu and Obama’s agreement to enhance cooperation on climate change, clean energy, and the environment. The Department of Energy provides further detail on these Clean Energy Cooperation Announcements.

US-China Clean Energy Cooperation and CCS

On January 18, at a ceremony at the US-China Strategic Forum on Clean Energy Cooperation in Washington, D.C., U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and China’s Energy Minister Zhang Guogao and Science and Technology Minister Wan Gang signed an agreement to advance the US-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC).

Department of Energy Report: U.S.-China Clean Energy Cooperation

On January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy released a report detailing the substantial progress made to date on a number of clean energy initiatives between China and the United States.

To download the report, click here

ChinaFAQs: Resources for the Hu-Obama Summit

China and the U.S. at the Summit

Ask the ChinaFAQs Experts: “What Outcomes Do You Hope to See From the Hu Jintao-Obama Summit?”

As Chinese President Hu Jintao and President Obama prepare to meet in Washington next week, economic and security issues have been receiving the most attention in recent press. However, the visit also presents an opportunity to discuss climate and energy issues, which have long represented areas for cooperation between the two nations, even amid tensions over other issues. We asked several experts from the ChinaFAQs network to provide their views on what they would like to see result from this summit.

What Can We Expect on Climate and Energy in China in 2011?

2011 will be a big year for climate and energy policy development in China, so we thought we’d highlight some of the key China energy and climate-related stories to watch out for during the course of the year. We’ve known to expect major developments now for over a year, since China’s commitments made at the Copenhagen climate talks in late 2009 were scheduled to be implemented in the 2011 12th Five Year Plan.

USTR Requests WTO Consultations on Chinese Wind Subsidy; Action on Rare Earths Still Undecided

The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) announced last week that it has requested World Trade Organization (WTO) dispute settlement consultations regarding one of the Chinese subsidy programs named in the United Steelworkers petition to USTR. According to USTR, these wind industry subsidies seem to be contingent on the use of parts made in China.

Report from Cancun: China Emphasizes Energy Policy Progress

As the first week of negotiations in Cancun concludes, China has been stressing its progress at home. That China takes the climate change issue seriously was the principal message at a recent Cancun event from Su Wei, the Director-General of China’s Climate Change Department under its powerful National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) and lead climate negotiator.