Renewables and Alternative Energy

Why China Is Acting on Clean Energy: Successes, Challenges, and Implications for U.S. Policies

Library File: 

Presentation by Joanna Lewis, Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and International Affairs, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, given at a Congressional briefing “Why China Is Acting on Clean Energy: Successes, Challenges, and Implications for U.S. Policies”, Washington, D.C., October 12, 2012.

Trade Cases on Imports of Clean Energy Products from China

The US department of Commerce and the US International Trade Commission have commenced proceedings in trade cases regarding imports of solar cells and other clean energy products from China. The matter is now progressing through the official process for handling such international trade cases. ChinaFAQs has assembled a collection of resources and statements from official sources, media, and concerned groups regarding the cases, and will continue to monitor developments as they unfold.

Diffusion of Clean Energy Innovations: Case Studies from China in Solar, Coal Gasification, Gas Turbines, and Batteries

ChinaFAQs Expert and Tufts University Professor Kelly Sims Gallagher recently gave a presentation on the global diffusion of cleaner energy technologies at the University of Texas at Austin’s Energy Institute. Her presentation offers a preview of her new book on the topic, forthcoming from The MIT Press in 2013. The book identifies the conditions necessary for motivating the international diffusion of cleaner energy technologies, and empirically investigates the extent to which certain barriers and incentives to their movement across international borders are valid in the Chinese context.

Ailun Yang

Ailun Yang is a Senior Associate on WRI’s major emerging economies team, where she leads the efforts to build the case for low-carbon development in a number of major developing countries such as China and India. In this capacity, she is tasked to design, plan, and execute research and policy analysis in order to influence national debates and build the evidence base to accelerate clean technology deployment and sustainable low-carbon development. Her current work focus is on the global coal market and China’s power sector.

Contact Info: 

AYang@wri.org
(202) 729-7784

China, U.S. and APEC Leaders Agree to Cap Tariffs on Green Goods

After meeting in Russia in early September, representatives of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) nations, including China and the U.S., reached an agreement on a list of environmental goods on which to cut tariffs to 5 percent or less by 2015.

Haibing Ma

Haibing Ma is Manager of the Worldwatch Institute’s China Program. A native Chinese, Ma’s primary focus is on China-related topics. His priority research and management areas at Worldwatch are clean energy and climate change, including an initiative to explore green economy potentials and impacts in China. Ma is also working closely with Worldwatch’s partners in China to explore the role of unconventional gas and to initiate renewable energy mapping programs at the provincial and local levels.

Contact Info: 

Worldwatch Institute
hma@worldwatch.org
(202) 452-1992 extension 517

5 Myths and Realities About U.S.-China Solar Trade Competition

“The specifics of this case speak most directly to the U.S. solar industry, of course, but also to trade enforcement in general and the U.S. economy more broadly. In this column we will examine the five most common arguments we’ve heard from the antitariff contingent in the U.S. solar industry, and why we think these arguments don’t hold water—drawing larger lessons about the key role of trade enforcement to the health of U.S. companies and our economy.”

Read the full article at the Center for American Progress…

Op-Ed: Blinded by the (solar) light

“The Obama Administration’s preliminary decision to impose a 31 per cent tariff on solar panels imported from China is short sighted. The move could cause a trade war, hurt the US economy, jeopardize US security interests, and put the world further off course in terms of meeting its global climate change goals.”

Read the full article at the Financial Times…

U.S. Commerce Department Announces Tariffs on Chinese Solar Cells

The U.S. Department of Commerce on Thursday announced its preliminary decision that it will impose anti-dumping tariffs of over 31 percent on solar cells imported from China.

Commerce is currently scheduled to make its final determination in early October 2012. At that point, if Commerce makes an affirmative final determination, and the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) makes an affirmative final determination that imports of solar cells from China threaten to injure the domestic solar industry, Commerce will issue an antidumping duty order.

CEF Event: Cooperation or Conflict? Contradictions in U.S.-China Clean Energy Relations

ChinaFAQs expert Joanna Lewis, professor at Georgetown University, joined Craig Allen, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia at the Department of Commerce, and Jigar Shah, President of the Coalition for Affordable Energy, for a discussion of U.S.-China clean energy relations at the Woodrow Wilson Center in May as part of the China Environment Forum (CEF).