Policy and Governance

China Tries to Come to Grips with Pollution

Press Call on U.S.-China Climate Discussions

When President Obama and President Xi Jinping meet next week in Beijing, climate change and energy will be important topics of discussion. As the world’s two biggest emitters, leadership by the U.S. and China is critical as each country’s actions are closely watched by the other and the international community. In addition, interest was heightened when a senior Chinese official talked about the possibility of peak emissions in China at the UN Climate Summit in September.

Clayton Munnings

Clayton Munnings is a Research Associate at Resources for the Future, a non-partisan think tank based in Washington DC. Clayton’s research focuses on the use of market-based instruments to reduce carbon emissions in developed and developing countries, including China. Clayton holds a BS in Science of Natural and Environmental Systems with a concentration in Environmental and Resource Economics from Cornell University.

Contact Info: 

Resources for the Future
Munnings@rff.org
Twitter: @ClaytonMunnings
(202) 328-5177

China’s “New Long March” through the UN Climate Summit: Context and Opportunities

This post originally appeared on WRI’s Insights blog:

The Long March was a watershed moment in Chinese history—the moment Mao Zedong’s nascent Communist Party escaped disaster in 1934 en route to forming a new nation. Fast forward 80 years, and China is poised to embark on a new Long March – but this time away from climate change and environmental damage toward a sustainable future.

Climate negotiator previews China's approach to UN Climate Summit

China’s chief climate negotiator, Xie Zhenhua, held a press conference Friday and made statements that may preview China’s approach to the UN Climate Summit on September 23rd.

Read more…

Cleaning China's Smoggy Skies: China Released Draft Air Pollution Law Amendments for Public Comment

This post originally appeared on NRDC’s Switchboard Blog:

Though a burst of clear skies on Monday allowed Beijingers to marvel at a magnificent Mid-Autumn Festival moon, a blanket of smog choked the capital the next morning, reminding citizens of China’s grave air pollution woes.

Mackay Miller

Mackay Miller is a Senior Research Analyst at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, USA, where he manages international collaborations with China, Mexico, India, and South Africa. His areas of focus include grid integration of renewable energy, smart grid deployment, and policy and regulatory issues across the clean energy spectrum. He coordinates several bilateral and multilateral initiatives including the US-China Renewable Energy Partnership and 21st Century Power Partnership. He also leads NREL support for the International Smart Grid Action Network and coordinates the Clean Energy Regulators Initiative. His recent publications include “Flexibility in 21st Century Power Systems,” “Market Evolution: Wholesale Electricity Market Design for 21st Century Power Systems” and “RES-E-NEXT: Next Generation RES-E Policy.” He holds an MBA from the University of Colorado, and a BA in International Relations from Brown University.

Contact Info: 

National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Mackay.Miller@nrel.gov

303-384-7536

Valerie Karplus

Valerie J. Karplus is an Assistant Professor in the Global Economics and Management Group at the MIT Sloan School of Management and Director of the China Energy and Climate Project (CECP) at MIT.

Her research focuses on resource and environmental management in firms operating in diverse national and industry contexts, with an emphasis on emerging markets and the role of policy. Dr. Karplus is an expert on China’s energy system, including technology trends, energy system governance, and the sustainability impact of business decisions. She leads the China Energy and Climate Project at MIT, an international collaborative team of researchers principally from MIT and Tsinghua University focused on China’s role in global energy markets and climate change mitigation.

Dr. Karplus has previously worked in the development policy section of the German Federal Foreign Office in Berlin, Germany, as a Robert Bosch Foundation Fellow, and in the biotechnology industry in Beijing, China, as a Luce Scholar and employee of the National Institute for Biological Sciences, Beijing.

She holds a BS in biochemistry and political science from Yale University and a PhD in engineering systems from MIT.

Contact Info: 

MIT Sloan School of Management

77 Massachusetts Ave.

Building E62-482

Cambridge, MA 02139

vkarplus@mit.edu

Phone: +1 (617) 800-7982

Fax: +1 (617) 253-9845

ChinaFAQs: What Are China's National Climate and Energy Targets?

Key Points:

  • China has a long term target to reduce the carbon intensity of the economy by 40-45% from 2005 levels by 2020
  • China also has binding targets to reduce energy intensity by 16% from 2010 levels by 2015 and carbon intensity by 17% from 2010 levels by 2015
  • China has a target to reduce coal consumption as a percentage of primary energy to below 65% by 2017
  • China has ambitious targets for renewable energy in 2015, 2017, and 2020

New Weapons in the War on Pollution: China's Environmental Protection Law Amendments

This post originally appeared on NRDC’s Switchboard Blog:

On Thursday, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC), China’s top legislature, approved major amendments to the country’s Environmental Protection Law (EPL), the first since the law was enacted 25 years ago.

These amendments are a game changer.