Energy Efficiency

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Song - GHG Capacity

Download from the link above “Building up Capacity to Support the Control of Sectoral GHG Emissions: a Case Study for the Cement Industry”, a presentation by WRI’s Song Ranping from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Fong - Local Target Planning

Download from the link above “Building Low Carbon Provinces and Cities: Practical Tools to Support Local Target Planning”, a presentation by WRI China’s Fong Wee Kean from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Zou Ji - Low Carbon Pathways

Download from the link above “Low Carbon Development in China: Vision, Issues, and Latest Progresses”, a presentation by WRI China Country Director Zou Ji from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Experts Weigh In on the Future of Coal Use in China

Coal will remain a critical part of China’s energy mix for decades to come, but growth will slow and then peak at perhaps 3.4 billion tons per year by 2020, Jiang Kejun of China’s Energy Research Institute told a group assembled for the WRI-US CAN-organized briefing on China and coal during the Tianjin climate negotiations on Monday.

Tianjin Briefing Oct. 5, 2010: Seligsohn - Industrial Efficiency

Download from the link above “From Grey to Green: Making China’s Rapid Urbanization Sustainable”, a presentation by ChinaFAQs Expert Deborah Seligsohn from “Coal Use in China: Future Use and Emissions Control”, A Briefing in Tianjin, China on October 5, 2010.

Tianjin Briefing Oct. 5, 2010: Barbara Finamore - Building Presentation

Download from the link above “From Grey to Green: Making China’s Rapid Urbanization Sustainable”, a presentation by ChinaFAQs Expert Barbara Finamore from “Coal Use in China: Future Use and Emissions Control”, A Briefing in Tianjin, China on October 5, 2010.

WRI Hosts "Coal Use in China: Future Use and Emissions Control", A Briefing in Tianjin, China

Many ask how China can control its CO2 emissions given its reliance on coal and its continued need for more energy. This briefing will look at future use scenarios and at current programs to make coal use more efficient and to develop the technology to capture and store the CO2.

Download the agenda and presentations by the panelists below.

Elizabeth Wilson

Dr. Elizabeth J. Wilson is an Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Policy and Law at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. She holds a doctorate in Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University and masters in Human Ecology from the Free University of Brussels in Belgium. Her research focuses on the development of carbon-managed energy systems. Recent work examines the regulatory and legal contexts for the deployment of carbon capture and sequestration technologies and evaluation of energy efficiency programs in consumer-owned utilities. Prior to joining the University of Minnesota she worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Contact Info: 

University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs
ewilson@umn.edu
(612) 626-4410

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions: China Closes Highly Polluting Plants

The big news this week is that China is removing outdated equipment from another 2000 plants, and they are moving quite rapidly – the equipment is to be phased out by the end of September. These closures are part of the tougher measures Premier Wen Jiabao announced in April. While some have expressed skepticism about this move, because equipment rather than whole factories are being phased out, in fact, this looks to be a positive move. While China has made significant efficiency advances by closing whole factories, there is a limit to how many such highly inefficient factories actually exist. As the very oldest, least efficient have been phased out, more sophisticated policies that pinpoint problematic equipment are needed.

Erica Downs

Erica S. Downs is a Fellow at the John L. Thornton China Center at the Brookings Institution. Previously, she worked as an energy analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency, an analyst at the RAND Corporation, and a lecturer at the Foreign Affairs College in Beijing, China. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. from Princeton University and a B.S. from Georgetown University.

Contact Info: 

The Brookings Institution
edowns@brookings.edu
(202) 797-6498