Energy Efficiency

Taking Action to Meet its Climate Pledge - China Enacts National Energy Efficiency DSM Regulations to Dramatically Scale Up Investments in Energy Efficiency

This post was co-authored with NRDC China Energy Efficiency/DSM Project Director Mona Yew and NRDC legal fellow Bruce Ho.

As we begin a new round of international climate negotiations in Cancun, China has taken another potentially giant step towards meeting its climate pledge. On November 4, 2010, China’s central government enacted national energy efficiency regulations that will establish national utility demand-side management, or DSM programs.

Report from Cancun: China’s Climate Progress Since Copenhagen

As negotiators arrive in Cancun for the next round of global climate talks, speculation once again hovers around China’s positions. China is a tough negotiator, and we can once again see it expressing concern about its core issues, including developed country mitigation commitments, technology transfer and the adequacy of financing. But as we look to negotiating positions, it is also worth stepping back for a minute to reflect on what China is doing domestically and how China’s efforts to promote energy efficiency and low carbon technologies can contribute to the global effort to combat climate change.

China’s Party Plenum Recommends Climate Actions in the 12th Five Year Plan

In addition to the Party Plenum Communique (discussed on this site last week), China’s Communist Party in its annual meeting (called a Plenum) issued an “opinion” on the 12th Five Year Plan. This essentially is a set of instructions and parameters to drafters of the plan. My colleague Fong Wee Kean in the WRI Beijing office translated the full paragraph 22 on climate change into English.

What Will China’s Next Energy Intensity Target Be?

A number of Chinese and international news outlets reported Monday that China’s next energy intensity reduction target (2011-2015) is likely to be 17.3%. These articles quote a Deputy Director named Huang Li at the Chinese National Energy Administration. This does not appear to be an official announcement, but rather one official’s comments on likely policy direction. The same People’s Daily article that quotes Huang stating the 17.3% target for the next five year plan and 16.6% for the following plan (2016-2020), also quotes an official from the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) as suggesting the next energy intensity target would be between 15 and 20%.

U.S. and China Advance Clean Energy Research Partnership on Building Efficiency

The U.S. Department of Energy recently announced its third grant under the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will receive $12.5 million from DOE over the next five years to lead a consortium on energy-efficient building technologies.

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Wang - Guiyang

Download from the link above “Lessons Learned from Guiyang Case”, a presentation by Renmin University’s Wang Ke, Fu Sha and WRI China Country Director Zou Ji from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Song - GHG Capacity

Download from the link above “Building up Capacity to Support the Control of Sectoral GHG Emissions: a Case Study for the Cement Industry”, a presentation by WRI’s Song Ranping from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Fong - Local Target Planning

Download from the link above “Building Low Carbon Provinces and Cities: Practical Tools to Support Local Target Planning”, a presentation by WRI China’s Fong Wee Kean from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Tianjin WRI Side Event 2010: Zou Ji - Low Carbon Pathways

Download from the link above “Low Carbon Development in China: Vision, Issues, and Latest Progresses”, a presentation by WRI China Country Director Zou Ji from “Tools for a Low-Carbon Pathway in China”, WRI’s Side Event at the UNFCCC conference in Tianjin, China.

Experts Weigh In on the Future of Coal Use in China

Coal will remain a critical part of China’s energy mix for decades to come, but growth will slow and then peak at perhaps 3.4 billion tons per year by 2020, Jiang Kejun of China’s Energy Research Institute told a group assembled for the WRI-US CAN-organized briefing on China and coal during the Tianjin climate negotiations on Monday.