Expert Blog

ChinaFAQs experts react to the latest headlines about China climate and energy issues.

ChinaFAQs
May 01, 2012

As leaders prepare to meet for the fourth annual U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) in Beijing this week, ChinaFAQs just released two new issue briefs that explore areas of collaboration between the two nations.

The papers highlight that both the prospect of a $2.2 trillion global market in clean energy by 2020 and expected Chinese investment of $300 billion over the next five years, to meet its ramped-up renewable energy targets in its 12th Five-Year Plan, present a huge opportunity for the U.S. Reaping these benefits will be challenging, but can be fostered by supportive U.S. policies, coupled with collaboration from private industry.

Letha Tawney
March 19, 2012

The watchword in today’s global energy markets is change. This change in part includes the advance of solar and other renewable energy technologies – advances that can boost economic growth, improve energy security, and help address global warming. However, reaping these benefits, and particularly the jobs that go with these global industries, requires a strategic approach to clean technology innovation. This blog discusses how the United States might use an innovation-centered strategy to compete in the increasingly tough global solar power industry.

ChinaFAQs
March 19, 2012

This week, the U.S. Department of Commerce is expected to issue a preliminary decision on a trade petition filed by SolarWorld Industries America, Inc. SolarWorld alleges that the Chinese have used subsidies to artificially suppress solar panel export prices, and has asked Commerce to levy a duty to eliminate that price discrepancy.

ChinaFAQs expert Melanie Hart and Kate Gordon at the Center for American Progress analyze this trade case and the implications of the decision for the U.S. solar industry and U.S. energy policy in “The Complexities of the U.S. Decision on Chinese Solar Panel Imports.”

ChinaFAQs
February 23, 2012

Kevin Tu, ChinaFAQs expert and senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, published a policy outlook earlier this month: Understanding China's Rising Coal Imports. This report analyzes China’s domestic coal consumption and import markets, and discusses next steps for managing China’s coal trade, production, and consumption patterns.

ChinaFAQs
February 09, 2012

Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping, expected to become president next year, is visiting Washington the week of February 13th. This has drawn attention to the future of the U.S.-China relationship. The visit presents an attractive platform to discuss climate and energy issues, which have often represented areas of cooperation between the two countries. We asked our panel of ChinaFAQs experts to provide their insights on top issues for new leadership to address on climate and energy, as well as prospects for the U.S.-China relationship on climate and energy under a Xi presidency.

Sarah Forbes
January 26, 2012

Today I testified before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission during a hearing on China’s Global Quest for Resources and Implications for the United States. In my testimony, I described the prospects for shale gas in China and its implications for the United States.

Luke Schoen
January 17, 2012

A group of government officials from China traveled on a study tour in the United States last week. The tour, hosted by the World Resources Institute, focused on low carbon development. The delegation was led by Director General Su Wei of the Department of Climate Change from China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC), who is China’s chief negotiator on climate change and a key decision maker for low-carbon development initiatives.

Angel Hsu
January 10, 2012

As part of its green diplomacy strategy and move to promote a positive image in Durban, China for the first time highlighted its own development aid in the context of South-South capacity building and financial assistance with least-developed countries (LDCs) and small-island states (SIDs).

On December 5, Xie Zhenhua, NDRC Vice Minister and head of the Chinese delegation in Durban, announced four major areas of investment through South-South collaboration, including...

ChinaFAQs
December 20, 2011

ChinaFAQs expert Angel Hsu and her colleagues from the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy team up with Columbia University, Chinese Academy for Environmental Planning and City University of Hong Kong for this report to help guide effective pollution control and natural resource management.

Deborah Seligsohn
December 16, 2011

The UN Climate Conference in Durban, South Africa, concluded over the weekend with a consensus to negotiate an agreement that will include all major emitters of warming gases. The conference agreed to a second commitment period for the Kyoto Protocol, extended the work of the group for Long-term Cooperative Action, and most significantly established new negotiations under the Durban Platform. Launching these negotiations was hailed as major progress around the world (Bloomberg, The Statesman, Xinhua). For the first time the world’s three major emitters (by total amount of greenhouse gases emitted), China, the United States and India, have agreed to begin negotiations for an international “protocol, another legal instrument or an agreed outcome with legal force,” indicating that there will be actions and efforts by all countries. (For the implications of this complex legal wording, see my colleague Jake Werksman’s discussion on WRI Insights).