Expert Blog

ChinaFAQs experts react to the latest headlines about China climate and energy issues.

Trevor Houser
June 12, 2013

China’s 12th Five Year Plan includes an array of energy targets that it hopes to achieve by 2015. The targets, such as increasing the share of non-fossil energy to 11.4% of the total energy supply and cutting the economy’s carbon intensity by 17% by 2015, are part of a larger plan for China to reach a 40-45% reduction in carbon intensity by 2020 relative to 2005 levels. ChinaFAQs expert Trevor Houser has crunched the numbers provided by China’s National Bureau of Statistics and come up with a report card on the country’s progress towards achieving its climate and energy goals.

ChinaFAQs
June 10, 2013

The following is a press release from the White House:

Today, President Obama and President Xi agreed on an important new step to confront global climate change. For the first time, the United States and China will work together and with other countries to use the expertise and institutions of the Montreal Protocol to phase down the consumption and production of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), among other forms of multilateral cooperation.

Manish Bapna
June 07, 2013

This post originally appeared on Forbes.com.

When President Obama and China’s President Xi Jinping meet in California this week, they will be seeking to build trust and chart a course for improved relations. While tensions abound over various issues, clean energy and climate is one area where cooperation can work.

Yingzhen Zhao and Clifford Polycarp
June 06, 2013

This post originally appeared on WRI Insights.

It’s well-known that China ranks first in the world in attracting clean energy investment, receiving US$ 65.1 billion in 2012. But new analysis from WRI shows another side to this story: China is increasingly becoming a global force in international clean energy investment, too.

Barbara Finamore
June 03, 2013

ChinaFAQs expert Barbara Finamore and her team at the Natural Resources Defense Council’s China Program have written a blog post entitled, “A Five-Part Strategy to Cap and Cut Coal Consumption in China.” In the blog, Finamore and her colleagues, Alvin Lin and Christine Xu, discuss the problems arising from China’s extensive coal use, as well as lay out potential policies that China could adopt to reduce coal consumption.

Coal for Electricity
ChinaFAQs
May 29, 2013

In April, the United States and China announced a new joint partnership that recognized the danger of climate change and “inadequacy of the global response.” Next month, China is expected to launch its first pilot regional cap and trade system.

Jonathan Moch
May 28, 2013

Trade negotiations between the European Union and China regarding solar panels have hit a bump in the road, as the European trade commissioner complained about Chinese pressure on individual EU nations that he said was designed to prevent Europe from reaching a consensus.

Coco Liu
April 29, 2013

Once again, China’s ability to handle a changing climate is being tested.

In 2013, rainfall in south China’s Yunnan province dropped 70 percent below average levels. This, combined with similar rainfall decline over the past three years, has turned the once water-abundant region into a much drier place.

China is among the countries most vulnerable to climate change. An extreme weather event like Yunnan’s years-long drought is just one of many problems it faces.

Ailun Yang
April 17, 2013

The United States and China are the world’s two largest economies. They are also the two largest producers and consumers of coal and the largest emitters of carbon dioxide. In recent years, however, their paths on coal have started to diverge.

Over the last few years, coal consumption has dropped dramatically in the United States, mainly due to low natural gas prices. In response to weak domestic demand, the U.S. coal industry has been rushing to find its way out to the international market. Last year, U.S.

Luke Schoen
April 14, 2013

The U.S. and China pledged to boost cooperation on climate change in a Joint U.S.-China Declaration on Climate Change signed by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Chinese State Councilor Yang Jiechi on Saturday April 13 in Beijing.