Expert Blog

ChinaFAQs experts react to the latest headlines about China climate and energy issues.

Jennifer Morgan
January 19, 2011

The United States and China both have a lot to gain from collaborating on clean energy, and President Hu’s visit is a symbol of China’s commitment to this partnership.

As the two largest cumulative greenhouse gas emitters, both countries are looking for ways to transition to cleaner energy while advancing their private sectors. China is moving quickly on renewable energy, clean technology, and energy efficiency but still faces the energy challenges of a rapidly industrializing country, and shares the United States’ heavy reliance on coal for energy.

Sarah Forbes, WRI
January 19, 2011

Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and representatives from the Chinese government, including Minister Wan Gang and Minister Zhang Guobao, signed a joint work plan to expand US-China cooperation on the Clean Energy Research Center (CERC) that was established in November 2009. The World Resources Institute is a member of the CERC, focused on advanced coal and carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS).

Following is a statement by Sarah Forbes, senior associate and lead for CCS, the World Resources Institute:

ChinaFAQs
January 19, 2011

On January 18, 2011, the Department of Energy released a report detailing the substantial progress made to date on a number of clean energy initiatives between China and the United States.

To download the report, click here

ChinaFAQs
January 18, 2011

China and the U.S. at the Summit

ChinaFAQs
January 12, 2011

As Chinese President Hu Jintao and President Obama prepare to meet in Washington next week, economic and security issues have been receiving the most attention in recent press. However, the visit also presents an opportunity to discuss climate and energy issues, which have long represented areas for cooperation between the two nations, even amid tensions over other issues. We asked several experts from the ChinaFAQs network to provide their views on what they would like to see result from this summit.

Deborah Seligsohn and Angel Hsu
January 05, 2011

2011 will be a big year for climate and energy policy development in China, so we thought we’d highlight some of the key China energy and climate-related stories to watch out for during the course of the year. We’ve known to expect major developments now for over a year, since China’s commitments made at the Copenhagen climate talks in late 2009 were scheduled to be implemented in the 2011 12th Five Year Plan.

Deborah Seligsohn
January 03, 2011

The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) announced last week that it has requested World Trade Organization (WTO) dispute settlement consultations regarding one of the Chinese subsidy programs named in the United Steelworkers petition to USTR. According to USTR, these wind industry subsidies seem to be contingent on the use of parts made in China.

Deborah Seligsohn
December 20, 2010

Deeper Cooperation with India

In the wake of China and India’s successful cooperation in the Cancun climate negotiations, it was not surprising that the two countries agreed to continue to cooperate on climate change issues during Premier Wen Jiabao’s just-concluded visit to India.

Jennifer Morgan and Deborah Seligsohn
December 15, 2010

The Cancun Agreements have been widely praised as a step forward for the international climate negotiating process to address climate change. In the run-up to this year’s meeting in Cancun there was a lot of concern about how the relationship between the United States and China would play out in the negotiations, and whether the competing interests of the world’s two largest emitters would be an impediment to progress. However, in these negotiations, there were improved relations– both in tone and engagement– between the United States and China.

Angel Hsu and Yupu Zhao, Yale University
December 10, 2010

In the politics of climate negotiations, which are often steeped in nuance and careful posturing, it’s easy to get lost in translation. On the ground in Cancun, reports have been flying about China’s so-called “game-changing” concessions, which could possibly “buoy” the climate Talks, which are quickly nearing an end. As we’re both on the ground in Cancun, we’re going to try to clear the air and get to the bottom of what exactly the Chinese have and haven’t said in the climate negotiations.