Expert Blog

ChinaFAQs experts react to the latest headlines about China climate and energy issues.

Sarah Forbes, Deborah Seligsohn and Logan West
October 25, 2010

As the international community confronts climate change, Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) continues to be one of the leading technical options for reducing Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions. Newly-minted in the updated Oxford English Dictionary, CCS is a process integrating a chain of technologies to capture CO2 emissions from major point sources such as fossil fuel plants (coal, oil, natural gas) or other industrial (e.g. cement production) processes and then store the CO2 permanently underground. In some cases, the stored CO2 can be used to enhance production of natural gas and oil. Numerous research and demonstration projects to advance CCS technologies are already underway in China, the U.S., and the rest of the world with more on the way.

Deborah Seligsohn
October 20, 2010

A number of Chinese and international news outlets reported Monday that China’s next energy intensity reduction target (2011-2015) is likely to be 17.3%. These articles quote a Deputy Director named Huang Li at the Chinese National Energy Administration. This does not appear to be an official announcement, but rather one official’s comments on likely policy direction. The same People’s Daily article that quotes Huang stating the 17.3% target for the next five year plan and 16.6% for the following plan (2016-2020), also quotes an official from the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) as suggesting the next energy intensity target would be between 15 and 20%.

Luke Schoen
October 13, 2010

The U.S. Department of Energy recently announced its third grant under the U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center (CERC). Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will receive $12.5 million from DOE over the next five years to lead a consortium on energy-efficient building technologies.

Luke Schoen
October 13, 2010

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Chinese Ministry of Environmental Protection recently renewed a memorandum of understanding to continue existing collaboration and establish new opportunities to work together on environmental protection.

Deborah Seligsohn
October 12, 2010

“The challenge for China is to find a third carbon pathway, one offering a high quality of life for its people, but at much lower emissions per capita than any of the developed country models,” said WRI China Country Director and Renmin University Professor Zou Ji at WRI’s official side event at the UN Climate Conference in Tianjin last week.

Deborah Seligsohn
October 08, 2010

China is hosting a UN climate meeting for the first time ever this week in Tianjin. While the venue has impressed most of the international visitors and the Chinese have gone out of their way to be good hosts, much of the enthusiasm for the meeting is not captured inside the conference center. Chinese companies and NGOs are energized by the event, but most are not officially registered organizations with the UN Secretariat, and thus need to hold their events outside the official venue.

Angel Hsu
October 08, 2010

Having the intercessional UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) meeting in China this week – the last stop before ministers and heads of state meet in Cancun for the sixteenth Conference of Parties (COP-16) – provides a timely opportunity for participants to witness firsthand elements of China’s clean energy and climate policies in action.

Luke Schoen
October 06, 2010

LBNL ChinaFAQs Expert Nathaniel Aden analyzes China’s revised energy production, consumption, and intensity data covering the years 1996 to 2008. Aden found the changes and implications to be significant.

Read the full analysis

Deborah Seligsohn
October 06, 2010

Coal will remain a critical part of China’s energy mix for decades to come, but growth will slow and then peak at perhaps 3.4 billion tons per year by 2020, Jiang Kejun of China’s Energy Research Institute told a group assembled for the WRI-US CAN-organized briefing on China and coal during the Tianjin climate negotiations on Monday.

Nick Price
October 04, 2010

Many ask how China can control its CO2 emissions given its reliance on coal and its continued need for more energy. This briefing will look at future use scenarios and at current programs to make coal use more efficient and to develop the technology to capture and store the CO2.

Download the agenda and presentations by the panelists below.