Expert Blog

ChinaFAQs experts react to the latest headlines about China climate and energy issues.

Jonathan Moch
September 06, 2013

Building on the joint statement released by President Obama and President Xi in June, the two leaders have released another joint statement on the phase down of hydroflourocarbons (HFCs). The recent joint statement shows that next steps will involve the creation of “an open-ended contact group to consider all relevant issues.”

Tianyi Luo, Betsy Otto and Andrew Maddocks
September 05, 2013

ChinaFAQs experts from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have projected that China’s coal use will peak in 2020 due to increasing energy efficiency and slowing energy demand. As ChinaFAQs expert Ailun Yang discussed, the continued expansion of coal in China faces many problems, such as economic problems with the power sector, strict control of energy prices, and the rising public concern over health and environmental impacts. In addition to these already substantial challenges, rising coal use in China will also run into substantial obstacles in the form of water stress.

Heshuang Zeng
September 05, 2013

This post originally appeared on TheCityFix.com.

The rapid growth of bus rapid transit (BRT) in China is leading to future opportunities to improve the overall quality of sustainable transport in China. Although the debate on who has the right-of-way on city streets remains, cities could still exert the maximum benefit of BRT by prioritizing the integration of BRT with other sustainable modes.

Transportation
Jonathan Moch
July 12, 2013

This has been a big week for U.S.-China collaboration on climate change. Yesterday the U.S.-China Climate Change Working Group (CCWG), which was established in April by the Joint Statement on Climate Change, presented their report on bilateral cooperation between the two countries. Not only does it lay out actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, a close reading sheds light on important themes for the future of U.S.-China collaboration on climate change.

Deborah Seligsohn
July 10, 2013

There is good news on international climate change cooperation.

The United States and China are reaching out to work in new areas related to climate change while also strengthening on-going cooperation. The two countries announced a new work plan today at the Strategic and Economic Dialogue meeting taking place in Washington.

Jonathan Moch
July 08, 2013

ChinaFAQs climate and energy experts and top media representatives took part in a ChinaFAQs press call on July 8th to preview the July 10th and 11th U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED), which for the first time will include a designated Climate Change Working Group. ChinaFAQs network experts discussed recent events and potential areas of U.S.-China cooperation, including air pollution, shale gas, carbon capture and storage (CCS) and more. The experts also offered insights into what the S&ED will mean for U.S.

Ranping Song
June 21, 2013

This week China launched its first pilot emission trading program. This development is potentially a major marker in China’s efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The Shenzhen Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) program will cover some 635 industrial companies from 26 industries. This is the first of seven proposed pilot GHG cap-and-trade schemes in China, which China has been developing since 2011.

Jonathan Moch
June 21, 2013

China is attempting to dramatically increase the country’s renewable energy supply by 2015. Recently released data shows that China made progress towards reaching this goal in 2012. China continues to make large investments in renewable energy, with over 80% more investment than the U.S. last year. China remains the country with the world’s most installed wind capacity, and it is neck and neck with the U.S. in terms of installed solar PV capacity.

Melanie Hart
June 12, 2013

This past weekend the White House announced the signing of a new agreement between the United States and China on hydrofluorocarbons, or HFCs, which are highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in air-conditioning units and refrigerators.

This new agreement is very big news.

Trevor Houser
June 12, 2013

China’s 12th Five Year Plan includes an array of energy targets that it hopes to achieve by 2015. The targets, such as increasing the share of non-fossil energy to 11.4% of the total energy supply and cutting the economy’s carbon intensity by 17% by 2015, are part of a larger plan for China to reach a 40-45% reduction in carbon intensity by 2020 relative to 2005 levels. ChinaFAQs expert Trevor Houser has crunched the numbers provided by China’s National Bureau of Statistics and come up with a report card on the country’s progress towards achieving its climate and energy goals.