Why China is Acting on Clean Energy

Why is China pursuing a low-carbon energy strategy, what are the benefits and challenges, and what can other nations learn from the Chinese experience?

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Emissions Trading in China: First Reports from the Field

China has set up seven carbon emissions trading pilots. How are they going?

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Clearer Skies Over China – Coping with Dirty Air and Climate Change

A look at China’s past efforts at controlling air pollution and the impacts of a carbon tax on Chinese GDP, air quality, and carbon emissions.

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4 Promising Themes Emerge in U.S.-China Agreements at Strategic and Economic Dialogue

What came out of the U.S.-China Climate Change Working Group Report?

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Latest from ChinaFAQs

Climate negotiator previews China's approach to UN Climate Summit

China’s chief climate negotiator, Xie Zhenhua, held a press conference Friday and made statements that may preview China’s approach to the UN Climate Summit on September 23rd.

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Cleaning China's Smoggy Skies: China Released Draft Air Pollution Law Amendments for Public Comment

This post originally appeared on NRDC’s Switchboard Blog:

Though a burst of clear skies on Monday allowed Beijingers to marvel at a magnificent Mid-Autumn Festival moon, a blanket of smog choked the capital the next morning, reminding citizens of China’s grave air pollution woes.

ChinaFAQs - Taking Stronger Action on Climate Change: China and the United States

This post updates a previous fact sheet in order to include information on prospects for a peak in China’s carbon dioxide emissions. [See third question.]

Key Questions:

  • Q: Is it true that China is not doing anything to address climate change?
    A: No, it is not true. China is taking action on multiple fronts to address the climate problem.
  • Q: Is it true that China’s coal use and greenhouse gas emissions are inevitably going to continue to rise throughout the 21st century regardless of what China tries to do?
    A: No. China’s carbon emissions and coal use rose significantly in the 2000s, but have begun slowing down in recent years.
  • Q:What are the signs that China’s carbon dioxide emissions will peak?
  • Q: Does it make sense for the U.S. to take climate action given what we know about China’s next steps on climate?
    A: Yes. China is now at a turning point regarding air quality and climate action.

The U.S. and China, Working Together to Speed the Benefits of Electric Vehicles

In 1896, American engineers faced a dilemma: what should power their new invention, the automobile? Henry Ford’s idea of a gasoline-powered car persuaded Thomas Edison not to pursue an electric model. Over a century later, the threat of climate change and the potential environmental benefits of electric vehicles have led the world’s two largest CO2 emitters to make the development of EVs part of their efforts to transition to a lower-carbon economy.

U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue Announcements on Climate Change and Low-Carbon Technology

Cooperation on climate change and air pollution were important themes of this week’s U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue held in Beijing, an annual meeting among high-level diplomats from both nations. The U.S. and Chinese representatives discussed their respective efforts to develop targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and announced a series of agreements under the U.S.-China Climate Change Working Group.

China and the United States Accelerate Efforts on Carbon Capture and Storage

This post originally appeared on WRI’s Insights blog:

China and the United States established eight new pacts this week to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

China's Climate and Energy Policies: Looking for the Best New Initiatives

Key Points:

  • China has been experimenting with many different policies to control carbon and energy intensity
  • By updating building codes to international best practices, China could save in 20 years an equivalent of the amount of CO2 that would be emitted by 15 large coal fired power plants over 20 years.
  • If China continues to improve fuel efficiency standards at its current rate, it will save the equivalent of the amount of CO2 that would be emitted by 10 large coal fired power plants over 20 years.
  • By expanding from pilots to a national level policy, the use of environmental priorities in selecting what electricity sources to use to respond to increased demand could significantly reduce coal use in the power sector.